Saving Water Saving Energy Blog

Bevan Griffiths-Sattenspiel
Sep 17 2010 - 5:19pm

The Union of Concerned Scientists has just released a fantastic new fact sheet called The Energy-Water Collision: 10 Things You Should Know, which highlights the water impacts of energy choices and ways to address them. The colorful fact sheet is packed full of great information, graphs and factoids that will send a clear message to policy makers and the general public about our water, energy and climate challenges.

Bevan Griffiths-Sattenspiel
Sep 17 2010 - 3:39pm

Natures Voice Our Choice (NVOC) is a nonprofit organization working on water-energy issues through their Water Resource Management for Energy Conservation program, which focuses on balancing water supply and demand, using green infrastructure to manage stormwater and reducing water use in power production.

Bevan Griffiths-Sattenspiel
Sep 17 2010 - 12:46pm

On Friday, September 10th, 2010, River Network’s Saving Water, Saving Energy program was invited to “inform, inspire and motivate” over 100 sixth through eighth graders during Making a Difference Day at Rosemont Ridge Middle School, located just outside of Portland, OR. The day was packed with fun activities – including the opportunity to take political action and experience first-hand the energy it takes to move water – as the schoolchildren learned about the important connections between water, energy and climate change.

Travis Leipzig
Sep 17 2010 - 11:30am

YOU are invited to attend a joint NEWEA Energy & Sustainability Conference, Exhibits & Tour on October 19-20 in Hyannis, MA. The conference will focus on energy efficiency, conservation and renewable energy sources for wastewater treatment facilities and will include...

Bevan Griffiths-Sattenspiel
Sep 14 2010 - 5:18pm

Researchers from the University of Nevada, Reno just completed a successful pilot run of a new technology that allows wastewater treatment plants to produce significantly more energy from sewage sludge through a process of drying and gasifying the sludge after it has gone through biogas digesters. The research team believes their renewable energy technology will reduce greenhouse gas emissions and cut energy and waste disposal costs at treatment plants.

Travis Leipzig
Sep 10 2010 - 1:11pm

Once again, Thursday has past and we have the opportunity to share with you another great edition of the Climate Post. This week, continue reading to learn what caused the US to fall behind China as second best place to invest in renewable energy, how China manages to achieve it's national energy-saving targets, and how to prevent climate-spawned wars, amongst other things.

Bevan Griffiths-Sattenspiel
Sep 9 2010 - 1:55pm

Circle of Blue reports that after four years and 22 different drafts, the U.S. Department of Energy continues to block the release of the National Energy-Water Roadmap, a congressionally mandated research agenda meant to help policy makers better understand the nation’s water-energy choke points and begin developing real world solutions. While the DOE's obstruction appears inexcusable, there is still plenty of information out there to start addressing our water-energy challenges.

Bevan Griffiths-Sattenspiel
Sep 8 2010 - 4:20pm

Got a great idea for reducing the energy and greenhouse gas emissions embedded in water? ImagineH2O is offering $100,000 to individuals or small businesses with a great idea for improving the energy efficiency of water treatment, delivery and use. Interested parties need to submit a summary of their project no later than November 15th, 2010.

Bevan Griffiths-Sattenspiel
Sep 8 2010 - 1:59pm

The Alliance for Water Efficiency just announced a request for proposals to help them design a new consumer-oriented water efficiency website equipped with an interactive water-use calculator that will show the public how much water, energy and greenhouse gas emissions they can save inside their home through simple water conservation and efficiency strategies. The new website and calculator are expected to launch in March 2011.

Bevan Griffiths-Sattenspiel
Sep 7 2010 - 4:57pm

Last month it was reported that more than 30 new coal-fired power plants have been built in the United States since 2008 or are under construction. In the absence of comprehensive climate change legislation, an electric utility in Kansas is finding out that water – not air emissions – may prove to be a more persuasive argument against building new coal plants.

Travis Leipzig
Aug 31 2010 - 4:43pm

A while back I wrote about the benefits – including water protection and potential energy savings - of recycling human waste for use as composting material.

Travis Leipzig
Aug 30 2010 - 11:14am

The Metropolitan Water District of Southern California - which is the largest supplier of drinking water in the United States and one of California's largest energy consumers - has just adopted new energy management policies. These policies will help the district move forward on programs, projects and initiatives for reducing the rising costs of electricity, implementing renewable energy projects and reducing greenhouse gas emissions in the face of climate change.

Bevan Griffiths-Sattenspiel
Aug 27 2010 - 9:16am

Thursday has past and another edition of The Climate Post is available. Have you ever heard of the Kochtopus? Keep reading below to learn, among many other things, about how the oil and gas industry out-spent environmental groups by a factor of 8:1 in the run-up to the defeat of the climate bill in the U.S. Senate, and why upholding AB32 – California’s Kyoto-style emissions standards that is coming under attack by the usual suspects – is a critical step toward addressing climate change at the national level.

Bevan Griffiths-Sattenspiel
Aug 25 2010 - 5:30pm

It looks like solar developers are finally realizing the value of water. A large-scale concentrating solar thermal plant proposed in Kern County, California has been approved by California regulators after developers agreed to cool the plant with reclaimed water that will be piped in from a neighboring community.

Travis Leipzig
Aug 23 2010 - 2:23pm

Thanks to a readers suggestion, I just stumbled across some great articles featured on Circle Of Blue Waternews which address our nations current energy supply strategies, developmental trends, and energy's dependence on water.

Bevan Griffiths-Sattenspiel
Aug 23 2010 - 12:48pm

Pennsylvania is one of the largest coal producing states in the country, with more than 250 mines churning out 65,414,000 short tons of coal per year, or more than 130 billion pounds of the country’s dirtiest source of energy. A report sponsored by the Citizens Coal Council and released last month provides an in-depth look at regulatory practices in Pennsylvania and finds that laws protecting water supplies from underground coal mining, specifically longwall mining, are inadequate and/or poorly enforced.

Travis Leipzig
Aug 19 2010 - 5:30pm

What is my favorite thing about Thursday's? Is it: A) It's my last day of the workweek. B) The Climate Post comes out. or C) Two Fillet-o-Fish sandwiches for two bucks at McDonald's down the street from my house. Read on for the answer.

Bevan Griffiths-Sattenspiel
Aug 17 2010 - 4:46pm

It’s bad enough that climate legislation is dead in the Senate at a time when we are seeing clear signs of human-caused global warming all over the world. To make matters worse, in the absence of climate legislation, more than 30 traditional coal-fired power plants have been built in the United States since 2008 or are under construction, signaling that coal will continue to pollute our water and warm our atmosphere for decades to come.

Bevan Griffiths-Sattenspiel
Aug 17 2010 - 2:58pm

An oft-cited criticism of clean, low-water using energy technologies such as wind and photovoltaic solar is that they generate energy intermittently and can overload power grids with electricity at times when nobody needs it. The Bonneville Power Administration is exploring one potential solution to this problem: storing surplus power in water heaters.

Bevan Griffiths-Sattenspiel
Aug 13 2010 - 3:10pm

As town's across the country adopt low impact development and green infrastructure strategies to manage their stormwater, many are finding that the benefits of these approaches go far beyond clean water. A report produced by the Bureau of Environmental Services in Portland, OR has quantified some of these benefits, including the direct energy savings resulting from the city's innovative Grey to Green Initiative, illustrating the significant energy and greenhouse gas emissions reductions that can be achieved through low impact development.