River Network Blogs

Our collection of blog posts from various River Network Staff and Programs.

Merritt Frey
Jun 4 2013 - 4:42pm

A nice, readable new report from Restore America's Estuaries and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) makes an obvious linkage clear: given what we've done to historic aquatic habitats (i.e. destroyed, fragmented, etc.) , if you want more fish you're going to need more habitat. The report is a short and by no means exhaustive treatment of the topic, but it may be useful to river advocates trying to make the case for the importance of habitat restoration in their own watershed.

Merritt Frey
Apr 1 2013 - 2:03pm

I've been inundated over the last few weeks with invitations to webinar sessions on an amazing area of watery topics. In case you are feeling as overwhelmed by the opportunities as I am, I thought I'd wade through the pile and high-grade the best of the free offerings for you. I've selected three of the most useful, most cutting-edge or otherwise most interesting offerings here for your consideration.

Merritt Frey
Mar 18 2013 - 3:07pm

Over the last year I've heard more and more rumbling about state assumption of the Clean Water Act's wetlands and stream alteration permit program. Case in point: the Alaska Senate's recent passage of a bill tasking the Environmental Conservation and Natural Resource departments with investigating state assumption of the program. "State assumption?" you say. "What's that?"

Merritt Frey
Mar 7 2013 - 2:14pm

The goal of a new River Network report -- Creative Partnerships in Volunteer Water Quality Monitoring: A What Works Snapshot -- is to provide creative ideas for river and watershed groups that are considering either creating a new volunteer monitoring partnership effort or adding a partnership component to their existing efforts.

Merritt Frey
Feb 8 2013 - 3:24pm

How about a little great news to wrap up this cold and snowy week? How about a legal decision that upholds permanent protection for 700 miles of perennial rivers and streams, 29 lakes, and 4,930 acres of wetlands in New Mexico? I'd call that some great news.

Merritt Frey
Jan 29 2013 - 10:19am

The January episode of our on-going video series, River Talk, features one of the true characters of the water world -- Barry Sulkin. In this episode, Barry shares the details of a project to watchdog wetlands mitigation requirements and how you can do this project in your own watershed.

Merritt Frey
Jan 25 2013 - 9:41am

As described in an earlier posting about lost rivers, I have a soft spot for our buried urban creeks. As in many cities, here in Salt Lake our creeks disappear beneath the city. As mentioned in that earlier posting, these creeks are often only traceable through the sounds heard through city drains.
Recently, a co-worker brought to my attention this really interesting website that plays with these sounds of buried streams in a most interesting way.

Merritt Frey
Jan 16 2013 - 11:05am

January is a time when many of regroup, revisit, and rethink our work. In that spirit, I wanted to share a great resource that came though my inbox: Evaluating Your Volunteer Water Quality Monitoring Program. This short fact sheet provides good examples and a step-by-step program overview you'll find useful even for non-monitoring program evaluation. Perhaps even more importantly, it provides some great resource links.

Merritt Frey
Jan 16 2013 - 11:05am

January is a time when many of us regroup, revisit, and rethink our work. In that spirit, I wanted to share a great resource that came though my inbox: Evaluating Your Volunteer Water Quality Monitoring Program. This short fact sheet provides good examples and a step-by-step program overview you'll find useful even for non-monitoring program evaluation. Perhaps even more importantly, it provides some great resource links.

Merritt Frey
Dec 31 2012 - 8:01am

Early this month, the U.S. EPA circulated new, draft guidance -- "draft Nonpoint Source Program and Grants Guidelines for States and Territories" – outlining expectations for state implementation of the Clean Water Act’s 319 nonpoint source pollution control program. River Network alerted our Partners to the comment opprotunity (Didn't hear about it? You should be a Partner and subscribe to the Partner listserve!) and commented ourselves.

Even thought the comment window is now closed, I wanted to share some information about the draft guidance. Why? Watershed groups may want to be aware of the proposed changes because they may impact funding for restoration or other projects you care about.

Wendy Wilson
Dec 30 2012 - 5:23pm

Agriculture in general and cows in particular use more water and pollute more rivers than all of our nation’s municipal wastewater systems combined.

Merritt Frey
Dec 27 2012 - 10:57am

During some of our recent Clean Water Act webinars, I’ve heard interest in a having a webinar or two on tribal governments and the Clean Water Act. As a result we’re offering up a 101, beginner session on this topic. Our hope is to provide some good basic information, but to also take some time for participants to share what else they need from an additional webinar or two on this topic. See the description below for more information.

Merritt Frey
Nov 26 2012 - 11:02am

This month's River Talk features Matt Rota of the Gulf Restoration Network talking about the Dead Zone, the Mississippi, and more. What is River Talk? Each month (or so) River Network staff interviews a leader in world of river habitat protection and restoration. The idea behind this video series is to allow River Network Partners and others to share their lessons learned with their peers.

In the November edition of River Talk, we cover two topics with Matt: 1.) what is causing the Dead Zone in the Gulf of Mexico and what can be done about it and 2.) some more personal musings about inspiration and lessons learned. (Please note: for technical reasons the volume on Matt's videos is not the best. Please turn up your speakers!)

Merritt Frey
Nov 12 2012 - 9:19am

More on the mighty bivalve you say? Why yes, more.

Todd Ambs
Nov 7 2012 - 1:16pm

Friends of the Los Angeles River is a 501(c) 3 non-profit organization whose mission for the past 25 years has been and remains to protect and restore the natural and historic heritage of the Los Ange